Exhibitions Past

Making Space: Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction

Joan Mitchell, Ladybug, 1957. Oil on canvas, 6' 5 7/8" x 9' (197.9 x 274 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase. © Estate of Joan Mitchell.

"Making Space shines a spotlight on the stunning achievements of women artists between the end of World War II (1945) and the start of the Feminist movement (around 1968). In the postwar era, societal shifts made it possible for larger numbers of women to work professionally as artists, yet their work was often dismissed in the male dominated art world, and few support networks existed for them. Abstraction dominated artistic practice during these years, as many artists working in the aftermath of World War II sought an international language that might transcend national and regional narratives—and for women artists, additionally, those relating to gender." Read more.

link to Museum of Modern Art

Joan Mitchell: Drawing into Painting

Untitled, 1992. Pastel on paper, 29 1/2 x 21 3/4 inches (74.9 x 55.2 cm). Collection of the Joan Mitchell Foundation, New York. © Estate of Joan Mitchell.

We are pleased to announce Joan Mitchell: Drawing into Painting, a survey of works on canvas and paper from 1958 through 1992, the year of the artist’s death. The exhibition, which will open on October 27, 2016, and run through December 31, will be accompanied by a catalogue featuring an essay by Mark Rosenthal. Read more.

link to Cheim & Read

Women of Abstract Expressionism

Cercando un Ago, 1957. Oil on canvas, 94 1/4 x 87 5/8 inches (239.4 x 222.6 cm). Collection of the Joan Mitchell Foundation, New York. © Estate of Joan Mitchell.

The groundbreaking exhibition Women of Abstract Expressionism will celebrate the often unknown female artists of this mid-twentieth-century art movement. More than 50 major paintings will be on view by artists working on the East and West Coasts during the 1940s and '50s: Mary Abbott, Jay DeFeo, Perle Fine, Helen Frankenthaler, Sonia Gechtoff, Judith Godwin, Grace Hartigan, Elaine de Kooning, Lee Krasner, Joan Mitchell, Deborah Remington, and Ethel Schwabacher. This will be the first presentation of works by these female artists together at one time. Read more.

link to Denver Art Museum

Joan Mitchell Retrospective: Her Life and Paintings

Un Jardin pour Audrey, 1975. Oil on canvas, diptych. 99.5 x 141.75 inches (252.73 x 360.05 cm). Private collection. © Estate of Joan Mitchell.

Museum Ludwig, Cologne, Germany: The Museum Ludwig is presenting a major retrospective of the legendary artist Joan Mitchell (1925–1992). The show focuses on her painting, ranging from early works from the 1950s to her later work during the final years of her life. Mitchell’s work is placed within the art-historical context of the period following Abstract Expressionism or in the milieu of the New York School. With some thirty paintings, some of which are very large-format and span several panels, the show at the Museum Ludwig presents one of the most important figures in twentieth-century art. Read more.

link to Museum Ludwig

Joan Mitchell Retrospective: Her Life and Paintings

Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria: Together with the Museum Ludwig in Cologne and in cooperation with the Joan Mitchell Foundation in New York, Kunsthaus Bregenz will be presenting a large-scale survey exhibition, in 2015, of the legendary artist Joan Mitchell (1925–1992). The show’s focus is on her painting – ranging from the early work of the 1950s to the late work of her last years. In terms of art history, her œuvre will be located within developments subsequent to Abstract Expressionism, that is the milieu of the New York School. Comprising nearly thirty pictures, including many largeformat, multi-part works, the show at Kunsthaus Bregenz will be a presentation of one of 20th century art’s most significant protagonists. Read more.

link to Kunsthaus Bregenz

Joan Mitchell: Trees

Trees, 1990-91. Oil on canvas, 94 1/2 x 157 1/2 inches.

Cheim & Read, New York, NY: Cheim & Read, in cooperation with the Joan Mitchell Foundation, is pleased to announce an exhibition of seven large-scale canvases by celebrated painter Joan Mitchell (1925–1992). The show is accompanied by a full color catalogue with an essay by John Yau. Read more.

link to Cheim & Read

Joan Mitchell: The Black Drawings and Related Works, 1964-1967

Untitled, c. 1964-1965, charcoal and pastel on paper, 24 x 18 in.

Lennon, Weinberg, Inc., New York, NY: In the spring of 1965, Joan Mitchell had her seventh and final exhibition at the historic Stable Gallery in New York where her career as a painter had been launched more than a decade earlier. Included in the exhibition were the first in a series of paintings that she described at the time as her “new black paintings, although there’s no black in any of them.” It would not have been known at the time, but these paintings had companion drawings, and those works on paper, never before exhibited, are at the heart of our presentation nearly a half century after they were made. Read more.

link to Lennon, Weinberg, Inc.

Ed Clark: Big Bang

Installation view, left: Ed Clark, Winter Bitch, 1959, acrylic on canvas 77 x 77 inches; right: Joan Mitchell, Untitled, circa 1962-64, 44 3/4 x 57 1/2 inches.

Tilton Gallery, New York, NY.

link to Tilton Gallery

Joan Mitchell

Untitled, 1958. Oil on canvas, 79 1/2 x 71 inches.

Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin, Germany: Galerie Max Hetzler is pleased to present an exhibition by Joan Mitchell in Bleibtreustraße 45, Berlin-Charlottenburg from November 10, 2013 until January 18, 2014. For the first time in Berlin, an exceptional ensemble of paintings and pastels from the almost 50 years of the artist's career will be featured. Read more.

link to Galerie Max Hetzler

Chamberlain | Mitchell

Installation view at Gagosian Gallery, Rome.

Gagosian Gallery, Rome, Italy: Gagosian Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition that juxtaposes paintings by Joan Mitchell and sculptures by John Chamberlain. Born just one year apart in the Midwestern United States, Mitchell and Chamberlain were inspired by the muscular spontaneity of Abstract Expressionists such as Franz Kline and Willem De Kooning. Mitchell is considered a principal figure in the second generation of Abstract Expressionists as well as one of the few female exponents. Her lively and impassioned paintings laud the beauty of the natural world. Chamberlain is best known for his metal sculptures constructed from discarded automobile-body parts and other modern metal detritus, where the industrial origin of materials is underscored by a cumulative formal elegance. Read more.

link to Gagosian Gallery

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